Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 21st World Congress on Nutrition & Food Sciences Sydney, Australia.

Day 1 :

  • Food Chemistry and Nutrition |Nutrition, Health & Aging |Nutritional Therapy & Treatments|Dietary Supplements & Functional Foods|Probiotics & Prebiotics |Nutritional Biochemistry |Obesity, Diabetes & Endocrinology|Human Nutrition & Dietetics|Renal Nutrition & Metabolism |Clinical Nutrition |Nutraceuticals & Medicinal Foods|Nutritional Epidemiology & Malnutrition |Food Processing & Technology |Nutritional Neuroscience & Eating Disorders|Nutrition & Cardiovascular Health|Food & Nutritional Immunology|Nutrition Education|Pediatric & Maternal Nutrition|Diet & Appetite|Nutrition in Cancer Care
Speaker
Biography:

Osama Ibrahim is a highly-experienced principal Research Scientist with particular expertise in the field of microbiology, molecular biology, food safety, and bioprocessing for both pharmaceutical and food ingredients. He is knowledgeable in microbial screening /culture improvement; molecular biology and fermentation research for antibiotics, enzymes, therapeutic proteins, organic acids and food flavors; Biochemistry for metabolic pathways and enzymes kinetics, enzymes immobilization, bioconversion, and Analytical Biochemistry and Immunology , Dr. Ibrahim was external research liaison for Kraft Foods with Universities for research projects related to molecular biology and microbial screening and holds three bioprocessing patents. In January 2005, he accepted an early retirement offer from Kraft Foods and in the same year he formed his own biotechnology company providing technical and marketing consultation for new startup biotechnology and food companies. Dr. Ibrahim received his B.S. in Biochemistry with honor and two M.S. degrees in Microbial physiology/ Fermentation and in Applied Microbiology. He received his Ph.D. in Basic Medical Science (Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular biology) from New York Medical College. He is a member of American Chemical Society, American Society of Microbiology, and Society of Industrial Microbiology since 1979.

Abstract:

Oligosaccharides are carbohydrates that have three to six units of simple sugars (monosaccharides). They are found in many plants with large amounts include Jerusalem artichokes from which most commercial inulin is extracted. They are also found in onions, garlic, legumes, wheat, asparagus and other plant foods.  Most oligosaccharides have a mildly sweet taste and have certain other characteristics, such as mouth feel they lend to food. This mouth feels characteristic interest food industry to add oligosaccharides in some foods as a partial substitute for fat and sugars and to improve texture.  Because 90 % of oligosaccharides escapes digestion in small intestine  and reach  the clone where it  perform  a different function  as a growth factor (prebiotics) that enhance the growth of beneficial bacteria (probiotics) in the colon. This recent benefit has increased the market for oligosaccharides.  Properties, benefits, legal status and manufacturing process for oligosaccharides available in the market will be highlighted in this presentation

Speaker
Biography:

Tabakaeva Oksana, doctor of technical sciences, Professor of the Department of food science and technology, School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University, is a Russian citizen. Far Eastern Federal University is the leading University of Russia in the Far East, which is actively developing scientific direction of new food technologies, and international cooperation with other universities in the world, including China. Tabakaeva Oksana has been working at the University since 1997. She is the author of 8 patents, 5 textbooks and over 150 scientific publications.Main scientific interests: study of algae and other seafood, boitechnology food, functional food

Abstract:

The aqueous extracts of four marine algae from the coastal areas in North Primorye, Russia, were prepared by boiling dried and frozen seaweed powder in water for 1 h, and by autoclaving each sample at 120 °C for 1 h. They were then freeze-dried and evaluated for their antioxidant activities. Boiling extracts of the seaweeds, except C. flagile, were found to have higher total phenolic contents than those obtained from the autoclave method. The antioxidant results also showed that O2•− scavenging activity existed only in the boiling extracts of C. flagile, M. greviller and G. verrucosa. In DPPH and OH assays, however, almost all the boiling extracts were less active than the autoclave ones. Among the four alga species, S. miyabei was the most active. Both extracts of this seaweed had the highest total phenol content and also displayed the strongest DPPH and OH inhibitory activities. A strong positive-correlation between the antioxidant potency and total phenol content of the autoclave extracts was found, while for the boiling extracts such relation was very weak. This result thus reflected that in addition to the phenolic compounds, there might be some other active components present in these extracts involved in the antioxidant activity.

Speaker
Biography:

Youqing Xu completed his Ph.D. from University of New England. She is a Professor, Vice Director of Fishery Sciences, Guangxi University, China. Publication includes more than 180 papers, 10 books, and 25 invention patents.

 

Abstract:

We hypothesized that dietary linolenic and linoleic acid supplements could promote the expression of the genes of key enzymes for biosynthesizing highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs), HUFAs, and growth performance of cobia (Rachycentron canadum). An experiment was conducted to study the effect of different dietary poly unsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) supplements on the expression of 6 fatty acid desaturase (FADS2) and fatty acid enlongase (ELOVL5) genes, survival, growth performance, and composition of juvenile cobia. Five groups of cobia juveniles in triplicate were fed for a period of 12 weeks using five different diets: control diet (CO) contained only basic ingredients; fish oil diet (FO) was added fish oil (rich in n-3 HUFAs); perilla oil diet (PO) was added perilla oil (rich in n-3 PUFAs); safflower oil diet (SO) was added safflower oil (rich in n-6 PUFAs); safflower-fish oil diet (SO + FO) was added a mixture of safflower and fish oils (rich in both n-6 PUFAs and n-3 HUFAs). The main results were as follows: (1) The expression of FADS2 and ELOVL5 genes in the brain, liver, and muscle of the juveniles fed SO was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that of the fish fed FO, SO + FO, and CO. (2) The highest specific growth rate (SGR) and the lowest feed conversion ratio (FCR) were found in the fish fed SO + FO and were significantly different (P < 0.05) from those of the fish fed CO and SO, respectively. (3) The hepatosomatic index (HSI) of all groups of fish fed PUFA supplements was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that of the fish fed CO. The highest HSI was found in the fish fed SO, which was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that of the fish fed other diets. (4) The PUFAs in the organs/tissues of the juveniles varied with the content of PUFAs in the feed. The LNA in the brain, liver, muscle, and serum of the juveniles fed PO was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that of the juveniles fed the other diets. Whereas the LA in above organs/tissues of the juveniles fed SO was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that of the fish fed the other diets. The highest DHA and EPA were found in the brain, liver, muscle, and serum of the juveniles fed FO. (5) The crude fat of the juveniles fed PUFA supplements was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that of the fish fed CO. However, there was no significant difference (P > 0.05) among the crude fat, protein, ash, and moisture of the juveniles fed different dietary PUFA supplements. We concluded that dietary LNA and LA supplements could significantly promote the expression of FADS2 and ELOVL5 genes in the brain, liver, and muscle of the juveniles; different dietary PUFA supplements could significantly promote the growth performance and increase the HUFAs in the tested organs/tissues of the juveniles; the optimum PUFA supplement was 3% of fish oil and 3% of safflower oil under our experimental conditions. 

Speaker
Biography:

Keri Brown received her doctorate (ND) Degree in Naturopathic Medicine from Bastyr University in Seattle, WA in 1998 and has successfully integrated nutritional, emotional, and structural therapeutics into a unique health approach. She is a founding member of Sojourns Non-Profit Community Clinic in Vermont, owner of Tallas Heath in Colorado, author, speaker, and entrepreneur. She focuses on utilizing holistic health information, cutting edge techniques, and common sense to support and inspire transitions in health. For over 30 years, Dr. Brown has been exploring and integrating the balance of nature, healing, science, and meditation.

Abstract:

Physical Observation for Nutritional Deficiencies: Learning how to observe physical features can help one determine nutritional deficiency patterns and health needs prior to disease occurring. This information is imperative in today's health care and in the "sub-clinical" patient, before disease progresses to outright symptoms and blood changes. Traditional doctors used physical observations of our body to confirm our health issues. They did not and could not rely on testing or blood work. Physical observations enable one to take the guess work out of nutritional deficiencies and organ health patterns. This class insures a measurement of patient evaluation as a critical tool in the medical toolbox. If pre-and post-nutritional evaluations and sound patient observations are added, the practitioner can confirm the findings while creating a recordable and even visual benchmark for patients to see the change and progress. This approach heightens the practitioner's ability to identify root causes, target priorities, and integrate patient interaction, while improving understanding, retention and compliance. Using functional assessments of the digestive system, thyroid, adrenals, and more, the health and direction of care becomes more obvious to see, treat, and monitor. While correlating specific observations and testing procedures, one can determine organ health, utilization of nutritional factors, and what direction is best for the client. We will look at the tongue, face, nails, reflex points, simple office testing procedures and holistic care to determine how to help our patients through physical observations for nutritional deficiencies.

Speaker
Biography:

Osama Ibrahim is a highly-experienced principal Research Scientist with particular expertise in the field of microbiology, molecular biology, food safety, and bioprocessing for both pharmaceutical and food ingredients. He is knowledgeable in microbial screening /culture improvement; molecular biology and fermentation research for antibiotics, enzymes, therapeutic proteins, organic acids and food flavors; Biochemistry for metabolic pathways and enzymes kinetics, enzymes immobilization, bioconversion, and Analytical Biochemistry and Immunology , Dr. Ibrahim was external research liaison for Kraft Foods with Universities for research projects related to molecular biology and microbial screening and holds three bioprocessing patents. In January 2005, he accepted an early retirement offer from Kraft Foods and in the same year he formed his own biotechnology company providing technical and marketing consultation for new startup biotechnology and food companies. Dr. Ibrahim received his B.S. in Biochemistry with honor and two M.S. degrees in Microbial physiology/ Fermentation and in Applied Microbiology. He received his Ph.D. in Basic Medical Science (Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular biology) from New York Medical College. He is a member of American Chemical Society, American Society of Microbiology, and Society of Industrial Microbiology since 1979.

Abstract:

Free sugars refer to monosaccharides such as (glucose, fructose) and disaccharides such as (sucrose, maltose) added to foods and drinks by manufacturer, cook or consumer, and sugars naturally present in honey, syrups, fruit juices and fruit juice concentrates’ Reducing free sugars intake to less than 10 % of total daily energy uptake was recommended by the WHO (World Health Organization) for the first time in 1989 and was further elaborated by a joint WHO / FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization) Expert Consultation. This new updated WHO guideline calls for further reduction of free sugars intake to less than 5% of total energy uptake if possible.This Guideline is to halt the rise of diabetes and obesity and reduce the burden of premature death due to non-communicable disease (NDCs). It does not refer to sugars in fresh fruits and vegetables, and sugars naturally present in milk, because there is no reported evidence of adverse effects of consuming these sugars.Metabolic pathways and WGO’s guidance on these free sugar intake will be highlighted in this presentation 

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Aging is associated with losses of muscle mass, strength and quality which are strong risk factors of functional incapacities. Physical activity and nutrition are two of the most promising non-pharmacological avenues to counteract functional incapacities. More precisely, High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT), a short but intense physical activity training, is recognised to improve metabolic function, aerobic capacity and body composition in older adults. Another potential avenue is L-citrulline (CIT), a non-proteogenic-amino acid which seems to prevent the loss of muscle mass and strength in older adults. Preliminary results showed a beneficial additive effect of CIT and HIIT on muscle function in obese older adults. However, it has been shown that the amount of protein intake could influence physical adaptations following exercise intervention and affect also the efficacy of CIT to improve body composition in malnourished people. We aimed to evaluate if the initial amount of protein intake could influence the combined effect of CIT to HIIT on body composition, muscle strength and functional capacities in older adults. Thirty-eight sedentary obese (criteria: % fat mass (FM)) subjects (67±5yrs) who ingested CIT (10g/d; blind-condition) and completed a 12-week elliptical HIIT program (cycle:30sec>85% and 90sec at 65% of maximal predicted heart rate; 3x30min/week) were divided a-posteriori into 2 groups according to the initial amount of protein intake (PROT-: <1g.kg-1.d-1 (n=18) vs. PROT+: >1g.kg-1.d-1 (n=20)). Functional capacities (4m-walking test, chair and step tests), physical endurance (6MWT), muscle strengths (knee extensor strength (KES), handgrip (HS)), muscle power (Leg power rig; MP), body composition (DXA) were measured pre- and post-intervention.  No difference at baseline between groups except by design for protein intake ((PROT: 0.78g.kg-1.d-1 vs. PROT+: 1.33 g.kg-1.d-1). Following the intervention (CIT+HIIT), all subjects improved significantly (p<0.05) on waist circumference (103.2 vs. 100.4cm), total FM (37 vs. 35.9%) and fat-free-mass (FFM:46.5 vs. 47kg), KES (315 vs. 367N), HS (32.5 vs 34.3kg), MP (151 vs. 180W), 4-m walking test (0.74 vs. 0.68sec), step test (30 vs. 34rep), chair test (19.0 vs.15.8sec) and 6MWT (549 vs. 618m).  Regarding the initial protein intake effect, PROT- decreased significantly more gynoïd (PROT-: T0:41.4-T12:39.1% vs. PROT+: T0:38.7-T12:39.1%) and leg (PROT-: T0:37.3-T12:35.2% vs. PROT+:T0:34.9-T12:34.7%) FMs and improved significantly more leg FFM (PROT-: T0:16.3-T12:16.8kg vs. PROT+: T0:16.8-T12:16.7kg)and HS (PROT-: T0:32.7-T12:35.9kg vs. PROT+: T0:32.4-T12:32.8kg) than PROT+. Our results show that CIT+HIIT combination is more beneficial in obese older adults eating initially less than 1 g.kg-1.d-1 of proteins since they had greater improvements on body composition and muscle strengths. Further randomized controlled trial are needed to confirm these promising results since protein intake was studied a-posteriori.

Speaker
Biography:

Zhaokun Ding completed his Ph.D. from University of New England and postdoctoral studies from National Research Council of Canada. He is a Professor, Director of Fishery Sciences, Guangxi University, China. Publication includes more than 180 papers, 10 books, and 25 invention patents.

 

Abstract:

The experiment was performed to investigate the effect of various dietary vitamin E (VE) or/and citric acid (CA) supplementation on the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and aconitase (ACO) genes, fatty acids, activity of antioxidant enzymes, and growth of juvenile cobia Rachycentron canadum. Seven groups of cobia juveniles in triplicate were cultured in experimental tanks using filtered and aerated seawater. The juveniles were fed twice a day using one of 7 specific diets: Control diet (D0) contained only basic ingredients; Diets 1 to 6 were added various doses supplementation of VE or/and CA based on per kg of dried feed. Diet 1 (D1) was added only VE 100 IU; Diet 2 (D2) was added only CA 12 g; Diet 3 (D3) was added VE 100 IU plus CA 12 g; Diet 4 (D4) was added VE 75 IU plus CA 6 g; Diet 5 (D5) was added VE 50 IU plus CA 3 g; Diet 6 (D6) was added VE 25 IU plus CA 1.5 g. The juveniles were fed for 12-week and sampled randomly for analysis in week 0 and week 12. The experimental results were: The expression of ACO and PPARα genes, PUFAs, n–3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (n–3 HUFAs), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S transferase (GST) in the analytical organs/tissues, the body weight (BW) and daily growth index (DGI) of the juveniles fed various dietary VE or/and CA supplementation were considerably greater than those of the fish fed D0, respectively. These parameters of the fish fed the diets with both VE plus CA supplementation ( D3 to D6) were significantly greater (P < 0.05) than those of the fish fed the diets with a single VE (D1) or CA (D2) supplementation, respectively. The feed conversion ratio (FCR) of the fish fed the diets with both VE plus CA supplementation was lower than that of the fish fed the diets with a single VE or CA supplementation and D0. The greatest expression of ACO and PPARα genes, PUFAs, n–3 HUFAs, SOD, CAT, GPx, and GST were found in the muscle and liver of the D5 fish and greater significantly (P < 0.05) from those of the fish fed other diets, respectively. The highest BW, DGI, and the lowest FCR were found in the D5 fish and differed significantly (P < 0.05) from those of the fish fed other diets, respectively. We concluded that various dietary VE or/and CA supplementation could considerably promote the expression of ACO and PPARα genes, PUFAs, n–3 HUFAs, activity of antioxidant enzymes, FCR, and growth of juvenile cobia. The effect of both dietary VE plus CA supplementation was significantly greater (P < 0.05) than that of a single VE (D1) or CA (D2) supplementation. The optimum diet was D5, with a VE of 50 IU and a CA of 3 g supplementation per kg of dried feed, in the experiment.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

The study focused on Pili nut (Canarium ovatum), an important nut-producing tree that is endemic in the Philippines. Seven varieties of Pili nut fruit were used in the study, all of which are being cultivated in a single soil condition. The study established the macro and micro minerals as well as potential toxic metal contents of both Pili nut pulp and kernel. Further, bioaccessibility of Fe, Zn, Cu, Ca, Mg and Mn were assessed through in vitro method simulating gastric and intestinal condition. Quantification was done using recently developed plasma technique Microwave Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (MP-AES). Significant differences were observed in some established parameters which may be attributed to distinctions per variety.  Major macro minerals in pulp are K (2822 to 4299 mg/100g ) and Ca (514-1092 mg/100g) while K (674-924 mg/100g), P (507- 646 mg/ 100g) and Mg (249-300 mg/100g) for the kernel. Pili nut also contains Na, Fe, Al, Zn, Mn, Cu, Ni, and Cr. Potential antioxidant Se is below the limit of quantitation, as well as the toxic metals Pb and Cd. Bioaccessibility of the pulp’s and the kernel’s minerals in the small intestine is high for Mg (pulp: 75-90 % , kernel: 54-61 %) and Ca (pulp: 15-41 % , kernel: 14-22 %) and in the following descending order: Mg > Ca > Cu > Mn > Zn > Fe. Large portion of minerals was released in the small intestine and an appreciable amount of minerals was observed in the colon.  After colonic fermentation of Pili nut kernel, appreciable amounts of Mg > Ca > Cu > Mn were still available for absorption. Fe and Zn are not detected in the large intestine due perhaps to an elevated phytic acid (173-229 mg/100g). The antinutrient tannic acid is higher in pulp (109-296 mg/100g) that may also contribute to the reduced availability of some essential minerals in Pili nut pulp. The Pili pulp and kernel are sources of several essential minerals that are bioaccessible for human nutrition. 

Speaker
Biography:

Wiphada Mitbumrung graduated bachelor’s degree from Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University. At present, she is a master’s degree student in food science for nutrition program at Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University. Research interest is an application of natural hydrocolloid and Application of emulsion for nutrient and non-nutrient delivery system.

Abstract:

Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) was an expanded cellulose prepared by hot alkali pre-treatment and mechanical force. Normally, MFC was extracted from agricultural sources so, this study used mangosteen rind for MFC production because it was a by-product from the food industry.MFC could be used as a natural emulsifier for encapsulation of fat-soluble vitamin in emulsion system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of MFC concentration on emulsion properties and stability. Oil-in-water (O/W)emulsion; oil phase (0.01% vitamin D3, 9.99% soybean oil), aqueous phase (MFC, 10mM phosphate buffer pH7) was performed by using different MFC concentration (0.3, 0.5, 0.7% w/w) using a 2-stage high pressure homogenizer. Encapsulation efficiency, oil droplet size, color, ζ-potential, microstructure, and creaming stability of the emulsion samples were measured. The result found that MFC concentration affected to emulsion properties and stability. The emulsion containing 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7% MFC expressed encapsulation efficiency 87, 93 and 96%, respectively. All emulsions exhibited mean droplet diameter in range 10 to 100 μm. The increasing of MFC concentration exhibited larger oil droplet, provided darker color and increased magnitude of ζ-potential. SEM micrograph showed MFC formed physical barrier around oil droplet which provided stability of emulsion droplets against coalescence. However, it was found phase separation at concentration 0.3%MFC but did not cream at concentration 0.5 and 0.7%MFC throughout 90 days.

Speaker
Biography:

K.N. Leung received his B.Sc. Degree in Biochemistry from The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) and obtained the Ph.D. Degree in Microbiology and Immunology from The Australian National University.  After two years of postdoctoral work at the Pathology Department of the University of Cambridge, he returned to the CUHK as a Lecturer in the Department of Biochemistry in 1983.  Prof. Leung was the former Dean of General Education in Chung Chi College, the Associate Dean of Science (Education) of CUHK and the Chairman of the Hong Kong Society for Immunology.  He is now an Adjunct Professor in the School of Life Sciences, CUHK and the School of Science and Engineering, CUHK (Shenzhen). His main research interests include immunopharmacological studies of natural products and Chinese medicinal herbs; cancer immunotherapy; nutrition, immunity and cancer.

 

 

Abstract:

Conjugated linolenic acids (CLN) are a group of positional and geometrical isomers of linolenic acid (C18:3) having three conjugated double bonds, which are relatively abundant in some plant seed oils. Recent researches have demonstrated the diverse health-promoting properties of CLN, including anti-obese, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor activities. In this study, jacaric acid (8Z, 10E, 12Z-octadecatrienoic acid), a CLN isomer that is present in jacaranda seed oil, was found to inhibit the in vitro and in vivo growth of the human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells,  with little or no cytotoxicity towards normal cells. Mechanistic studies indicated that jacaric acid could trigger apoptosis in the HL-60 cells by inducing mitochondrial membrane depolarization, modulating the expression of apoptosis-regulatory proteins, inducing the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, and by differential activation of caspase-3 and -9 but not caspase-8 activities in HL-60 cells. Interestingly, jacaric acid could alleviate the allergic response in a human mast cell line HMC-1 by suppressing the release of β-N-acetylglucosaminidase, tryptase and cytokines such as interleukin-4 and -13 in sensitized HMC-1 cells. Moreover, the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 proteins were down-regulated in jacaric acid-treated HMC-1 cells whereas the expression of TIMP1 protein was increased. Taken together, our results indicate that jacaric acid can exhibit significant anti-tumor and anti-allergic activities on human cells and therefore might be a potential functional food for the management or as an adjunct therapy for some forms of myeloid leukemia and allergic disorders.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Bingbing Liu is under her fourth year of PhD at the age of 25 years in Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University. Her research interests are food chemistry, natural products and HPLC. She has completed several researches, including synthesis of a new antioxidant that can be applied to food and cosmetic industry.


    
 

Abstract:

Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) and linoleic acid (LA), abundant in chia seed oil, are useful polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) with numerous health benefits. The objective of the present study was to explore the possibilities of the direct analysis of ALA and LA in chia seed oil by reverse-phase HPLC-UV. The results showed that the HPLC-UV method proposed allowed for determining the concentrations of ALA and LA in chia seed oil without applying any isolation or derivatization step. The method was found to be direct, sensitive (LOQ 0.34 mg/ml for ALA and 0.04 mg/ml for LA), precise (RSD ≤ 5%). Thus, the proposed experimental designs were shown to offer considerable advantages over traditional derivatization approaches.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Chamil Senevirathna has obtained his MPhil from the Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka. He is a lecturer in the Department of Health Promotion, Rajarata University of Sri Lanka. He has already published seven full papers in reputed journals and 15 abstracts. He has already visited 15 international conferences to share the knowledge related to his research work.

Abstract:

Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) can be known as the biggest cause of pre mature deaths worldwide. It is revealed that the children’s nutrition is primary driven by the unhealthy food environment which promotes energy dense foods as well as discouraging the physical activities. It is widely recognized that there is a strong relationship between malnutrition and risk of obesity.

Aim of this study was to determine the behavior and practices related to the diet and physical activities in school students in a rural district in Sri Lanka

This cross sectional study was employed among 603 students who were selected through the multi-stage stratified cluster sampling technique.  The Global School Health Questionnaire (GSHS) was implemented to collect information related to the behavior and practices on diet and physical activities among school students. Height and weight was measured using standard protocol and BMI was calculated. SPSS 20.0 version was used to analyze data.

There were 51.6% females in the sample. Majority of students (35.5%) represented the age group 15 years old. Mean BMI was 18.15 Kgm-2 (3.82 SD) It was observed that 65.7% of them underweight while 8.0% were overweight. Results suggested that 72% students bought foods from the school canteen and 36.2% consumed junk foods. Study revealed that only 21.6% students engaged with a sport in the school.

Majority of students of the study were underweight. Most of the students consumed unhealthy foods and consumption of healthy foods found to be very low. Majority of students of the study weren’t physically active. 

Speaker
Biography:

Wilda Yunieswati is a post-graduate student in Department of Community Nutrition, Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia. She gets the scholarship from Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education for her master study in Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia. She has her expertise in community nutrition and passion in improving the nutrition, health, and wellbeing. She has an experience in public community activity especially about children education and children nutrition. She joins some of public community in Bogor, Indonesia to improve the nutritional and health knowledge of school-age children and hope they can get better nutrition, health, and life in the future

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Labor from agricultural sector is the largest labour force in Indonesia, which reached 32.61% of Indonesian total labor force, but the agricultural sector only contributed 14.43% of total GDP. This condition indicates that work productivity in agriculture sector is low. Cocoa is one of the leading commodities in plantation sub sector. Cocoa development has a potential part in the economy development and contributes as the third largest Indonesia’s foreign exchange after palm oil and rubber. One of the way to improve the productivity of cocoa is give an attention about the good nutrition and good health of the cocoa farmer. Nutrition and health status have been widely known as a factor to improve work productivity of farmers. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: The subjects of this study were male cocoa farmers in two districts of Polewali Mandar, West Sulawesi, Indonesia aged 18-65 years old. Data collected by interview with questionnaire and measured directly for anthropometry status. Findings: The result of this study shows that there is no relationship between nutritional status, food consumption and lifestyle to work productivity, but there is a relationship between health status (blood pressure) and amount of cocoa picked per day (kilograms) and also health status (central obesity) and number of absent day to plantation due to sick. Besides that, there is no relationship between poor diet and health status (hypertension and central obesity) in male cocoa farmers. In this study, variables that influence the hypertension are exercise (OR: 3.836), genetic (OR: 312) and smoking habit (OR: 0.206). Then, variables that influence the central obesity are energy adequacy (OR: 9.64), exercise (OR: 5.0) and protein adequacy (OR: 1.58).

Speaker
Biography:

Doctor in Nutrition and Food Science of the University of Chile. This researcher has as main investigation focus the obtaining and stabilization of bioactive compounds from natural sources, in order to incorporate them into functional foods. For this purpose, it has used technologies such as of supercritical CO2 extraction and of microencapsulation by spray drying and lyophilization. Actually Dr. Bustamante is part of the Nutrition Department of the University of Chile

Abstract:

Pomegranate peels are a concentrated source of punicalagin, a condensed tannin with antioxidant properties. On the other side, pomegranate seed oil (PSO) is a polyunsaturated oil with potential health benefits but unstable when exposed to environmental conditions. Microencapsulation is an alternative to add functional compouds to food matrices. Therefore, the objective of this work was to optimize the microencapsulation of pomegranate peel extracts (PPE) and the oxidative stability evaluation of PSO with the addition of PPE microparticles (M-PPE) under rancimat test conditions. M-PPE were elaborated by spray-drying with modified starch. Microencapsulation optimization was performed with a Box-Behnken design that considered the variables extract/encapsulant ratio (1:0,8-1:3,2) and air inlet temperature (148-205 °C). The response variable was punicalagin encapsulation efficiency (%) that was optimized by response surface methodology. 1-4 g M-PPE elaborated under optimal conditions were added to PSO, placed into a Rancimat standard tube and subjected to the test operation by applying 65°C and a flow air of 20 mL/h.  Oil oxidation was evaluated by total fraction of non-volatile lipid oxidation products and their distribution in triacylglycerol oligomers, triacylglycerol dimers (TGD) and oxidized triacylglycerol monomers. Results showed that PSO oxidation pattern is characterized by formation of polymers from early stages of oxidation. The level of polymerization increased considerably after 25 h of oxidation. However, the addition of  M-PPE decreased oxidized polymers formation respect to oil without     M-PPE. The results indicated that M-PPE could potentially be used to slow oxidation reactions occurring in polyuinsaturated oils such as PSO.